The Real Pierre Elliott Trudeau — A Child’s View, in Retrospect

The Real Pierre Elliott Trudeau - A Child's View in RetrospectForeword:

The cartoon-girl is supposed to be me, but actually, I had curly hair. I just couldn’t draw curls in Windows Paint to save my life. And if my grandmother had seen that short red dress, she’d have been letting the hem down overnight and sneak it back into my closet before the morning. But the house and the school are kinda cute, very close to the real things where I grew up and where

I studied for the first seven years of school at Saint Augustine’s of Canterbury. The school was right next door to our Catholic church of the same name, whose bells could be heard ten blocks away in bed, every Sunday morning.

I wrote the script and drew the initial cartoon slides in 2011, intending to make a video. Then my Dell D600 hard drive crashed.

I have learned the hard way not to entrust my hard drives to repair technicians. They have an unfortunate habit of deleting the contents. (Especially when I pay them using my bank card, which is being traced.)

I therefore had to learn (a) to repair my own D600 with second-hand spare parts and “How To” videos from YouTube, (b) instal Windows XP Pro SP3, (c) configure all my own programs, and finally, (d) use various kinds of recovery software to rescue my files from crashed hard drives.

It took me until late in 2013 to recover the drive that crashed in 2011. Among the treasures that I dredged back up was this old, incomplete animated video, a Child’s View of Trudeau.

Only two minutes of the video had been finished out of the 8-10 minutes planned. It would take too long right now to finish it, so pardon me if I grab a few slides to illustrate the gist, and give you the script, below.

Animation and cartoons aside, this is a real story about The Real Pierre Elliott Trudeau — A Child’s View in Retrospect.

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The Story

When I was about 12 or 14 years old, and home from school for the afternoon, I switched on our old black and white floor-model TV, and there was Pierre Elliott Trudeau.

This would be around 1965-1967. Trudeau was not yet Prime Minister. As I was not a political kid, I couldn’t tell you what he was at the time. But, from my reading today, I would say that during that broadcast, he had probably already been recruited by Soviet spy, Prime Minister Lester Pearson, and had been or would soon be elected to Parliament as a so-called “Liberal” and enter Pearson’s cabinet.

This was on channel 6 or 12 (CBC or CTV in Montreal, Canada). We had rabbit ears and picked up only channels 2 and 10 (which were French), and 6, 12, 3 and 5 (which were English; but 3 and 5 were American, ABC and NBC).

So, I suspect that Trudeau was on channel 6 at the time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, a national “news” and entertainment network formed by federal statute, the Canadian Broadcasting Act, 1936 and By-Laws. (In other words, looking back, this was Canada’s Pravda.)

So, there was Trudeau in a suit being interviewed. He was describing his ideal society. And, again, looking back, he must have been testing the waters; for, as he never openly discussed it again, in these terms, he must have decided that viewer response was not sufficiently favorable to openly  inflict Communism on Canada.

I know I remember this pretty well, because after the show, I quickly descended the basement stairs of our wholly-owned non-mortgaged duplex at 2264 Hingston Avenue in NDG to the old Underwood manual typewriter, and I wrote a funny story about Trudeau’s ideal society.

I called my story “CLANADA”, with an “L” in it; that’s not a typo.

However, back to Trudeau — and keep in mind, I could write this as an affidavit.

In Trudeau’s ideal society, there would be no private property. You would own nothing. You would not even own the chair you sat in to watch Mr. Trudeau on television. And obviously, you would not own the television.

Because, said Trudeau, there would be no stores. You could not buy things any more. Instead, you would go to a central warehouse run by the government where you would receive all you need, which is to say, all that government decided  you need. You would exchange a chit for this, which the government had issued.

For example, said Trudeau, in this warehouse there would be only a few models of couches, beds and chairs, and a limited assortment of pictures to put on your wall. The purpose of this limitation in style and variety was “equality”. Said Trudeau, people would be “equal” only if they all owned nothing and had the mere use of pretty much the same “things”.

Keep in mind, this is coming from a man who when he finally left the home owned by his mother, bought himself a mansion which he later fitted with an indoor swimming pool. Newspaper columnist Peter Worthington suspected the pool was at Canadian taxpayers’ expense, although it was said to have been a gift of wealthy businessmen. (If the latter is true, perhaps the wealthy capitalists were “equalizing” one of their own with themselves.) Therefore, Mr. Trudeau, his wife and his own children, did not have to mingle with the “equal” people at the low-brow community swimming pool.

pool

Mr. Trudeau certainly did not live the lifestyle he recommended for others.

One would therefore have to think that Trudeau did not consider himself “equal” to others. Apparently, in his ideal society, he would be “more equal” — as no doubt would friends of his who also lived up the hill in pool-equipped mansions, or in posh Westmount homes.

As a kid, I didn’t know what Communism was, so I really just thought Trudeau was crazy.

I snorted and chuckled with amusement as I banged out my child’s satire of the great man’s views for Canada on my grandfather’s old Underwood — which in Trudeau’s ideal world, I would not have the use of, due to abolition of inheritance, and more importantly, laws against criticizing Communism. (As a child-intellectual with all the wrong views, I’d have been quickly sent for “re-education”. But I know for sure, it wouldn’t have worked. I’d have ended up, like Vladimir Bukovsky, in lunatic asylums for penning politically incorrect views about the North American Union, and slurring the Canadian Commisars.)

The story I wrote was of Trudeau’s ideal country, where you didn’t even own the bed you slept in.

Moreover, in my story, you had to share  your bed with a neighbour, because it rolled through the wall in the morning, into the next apartment, to be slept in by someone else coming home from his shift at the workplace.

I no longer have a copy of that story, and I can’t remember any more details. But, obviously, today, I know for sure that Pierre Elliott Trudeau was a Communist. Which is to say, he merely advocated  Communism for the rest of us. (It just took Alan Stang to remind me.)

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UPDATE 26 November 2015: Researchers can now DOWNLOAD files of all chapters of the 1972 Parti Québécois Manifesto for a Communist State of Quebec, that I have translated into English to date. That is 90% of it, more than is currently posted online in html. This links expires in 5 days from 26 Nov 2015. I will try to replace it as necessary:

https://www.sendspace.com/file/31b9n3